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20120928
20121006
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
care system that is broken, energy policies that are not working, because 10 days ago, john said they are sound. >> say to him? [laughter] >> are you afraid i would not hear him? >> i am trying to get you to talk to each other. >> unless we are holding ourselves accountable day in and day out, not just where there is a crisis for folks who have power and influence and to hire lobbyists, but for the nurse, the teacher, the police officer who, at the end of each month, they have a financial crisis going on. they will have to take out extra debt to make their mortgage payments. we have not been paying attention to them. >> professor alan schroeder, your take away. >> in 2008, the campaigns negotiated an agreement that allowed them to talk to each other. they did not want to do it. you see jim is trying to pull teeth to get them to talk to each other. i do a lot of research on televised campaigns around the world. the candidates spent the entire debate talking to each other in past debates. it is like a tennis or ping-pong game. the moderator's get out of the way and have a very litt
for majority leader, but we know who you not vote for, john cornyn. if the republicans gain control of the senate -- you have said twice, on two occasions, you would not guarantee you would support john cornyn. that is because your money comes from jim demint. if you are interested texas, how could do not support our senior senator majority leader in the abandoned the majority party if the republican party? you will not commit to him. >> mr. cruz? >> if mr. sadler suggests that as a criterion voters should use, who will stand more closely with john cornyn, that is not a complicated question. john is enthusiastically supporting me with in this campaign. he is campaigning on the road with me. >> the question is whether you would support him. >> we will try one more time. >> would you vote for john cornyn as majority leader of the senate? >> he is not running for majority leader. >> would you vote for him? >> i know you are believing you are cross-examining a witness >> just answer my question. yes or no. >> i know you are leaving -- yes or no. >> let me know when you are done. >> give
becoming more polarized and more centered on the left and right. mccainearly 2000's, john carry 20% of the republican senate caucus formication/fine gold. it happened in the house because moderate republicans voted for it against their party leadership. those senators who voted for mccain- feingold are gone. the party has moved on and the ball. the ball. but there the 1990's were perennial discussions about changing the campaign of finance. it took place in the world or someone like the republican leader was interested in making sure each of the republicans got a good deal or not a bad deal but he is not opposed to reform or legislation. this is partially or largely because we have an fcc that is deadlocked at 3-3 because it takes four votes. that is a 2/3 requirement for the fcc to do anything. it is now as a prize of they don't. i think there really is a change in the way congress looks at this in a non-partisan way. i still hold out hope that after the election in the new congress that will at least take care of this of this closure. -- of this disclosure. they say the disclosu
as a cancer surgeon today at johns hopkins. but i bumped into one of those people i met later life and he was at a conference and he said, how many of you know another doctor who should not be operating because he or she is too dangerous. every single one of the 2000 people in the audience raised their hands. we have a serious problem with the mass of variation and the quality of health care. it frustrates doctors alike just as much as patients. unless we get to this issue of quality, getting to measuring it, how will we address health care costs in the u.s. and? dr.: back in the 1970's, nolan from minnesota wrote a book, ", a surgeon under the knife" and it was a best seller at the time. are you familiar with the book? guest: it is a great book. i applaud anyone who comes out and speaks openly and honestly about the problems in health care without alienating the doctors or the medical community. let's face it, there are a million doctors in the u.s.. they are on the better side of health care. we ought to be careful about the inflammatory ways this can be treated by the media. we should
-- to be specific, ken john boehner -- can't john boehner say he will make a deal with barack obama even though he is in the middle of an election? >> that is a good question. a leading player in texas who is now on k street, but more on the debt -- the democratic side. in a conversation, the republican said, the democrats will have to to -- will have to cave on taxes because john minnert cannot -- and john painter cannot move his caucus before january 1, but the president can rollover before then. i think we see this as a prescription for never getting anywhere. the hope is that after the election, the discussion proceeds in such a fashion that there can be agreement in december. but i think the very point and you mentioned is one of the reasons that it is more likely we get a deal in january than december. it is precisely because of what you just mentioned about john boehner and the elections in the house. i should state it more clearly the bottom line question is, what does it take the house republican caucus to move? i hope i am wrong on this. i believe the house republican caucus will not mov
, the president was winning independent voters by 13 points. in 2008, he defeated john mccain by 8. i will be looking at the independent numbers. the other thing, too, very quickly, and in terms of minorities and youth vote, the other thing about barack obama's election in 2008 was that he wants something on the order of 43% of the -- won something on the order of 40% of the white vote. look, the country is changing. in 2008, 3/for the electorate was white, down from the mid-to- high-80s years ago. in a very close election, i don't think anyone thought it would be a seven-point race. the metrics are there for him to win. >> to me the most -- sorry to interrupt -- to me the most stunning numbers from 2008 -- one, if you take out the 18-to- 29-year-olds, mccain and obama tied. that shows you how important the youth vote is. by the way, that is why use the air force one is showing up at universities in swing states. the other factor is that john mccain beat barack obama 55-43 among white voters. george w. bush in 2000 beat al gore among white voters 55-43. the margin is the same. so how
and being republican, it is not happening at all. host: you might remember john anderson won 6.6% of the national vote. ralph nader has won several times. you have been called the original tea party candidate. i want to play a little bit of tape with ross perot. we will show this interview tonight at 9:00 p.m. he reflects on the tea party movement. let's take a listen. [video clip] >> i'm wondering what your thoughts were with the tea party revolution. >> it was interesting to see that happen. i was surprised. i think it had managed in impact, don't you? i think it was a healthy thing to happen. hopefully a lot of american citizens. host: what do you make of the tea party movement? guest: the notion of dollars and sense that we have to balance revenues with expenditures -- initially it was all about spending. i am an line with that. talk about the occupied movement. it is about the inequality that exists in this country. i don't think republicans and the difference between corporate welfare and free markets. democrats, the same way. by adopting the fair tax, i think we kick hal
. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the prayer will be offered today by our chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: let us pray. eternal god we give you thanks for giving us another day. we thank you once again that we your creatures can come before you and ask guidance for the men and women of this assembly. send your spirit of peace, honesty, and fairness during these weeks of political campaign. may their ears and hearts be opened to listen to the hopes and needs of those whom they represent and whom they seek to represent. bless the people of this great nation with wisdom, knowledge, and understanding that they might responsibly participate in our american democratcy. -- democratcy. please keep all who work for the people's house in good health that they might faithfully fulfill the great responsibility given them to the service to the work of the capitol. bless us this day and every day and may all that is done here be for your greater honor and glory. amen. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to section 3-a house resolution
voters by 13 points. in 2008, he defeated john mccain mike 8%. -- by 8%. i will be looking at independent numbers. in terms of minorities, yet about obama possible election in 2008 is he won on the order of 43% of the white of the. in most of the national polls, that is kind of where it is. the country is changing. in 2008 compared 3/4 of the electorate was white, which was down to the bimid high 80%'s. and a close election, nobody thought this is going to be a seven-point race. the metrics are there for him to win. >> to me, i wanted to add on, the most stunning numbers from 2008, if you take out the 18- to 29-year-olds, mccain and obama tied. the other factor is john mccain be to barack obama 55 to 43 among white voters. george bush in 2000 beat out or 55 to 43, the same margin. how did gore and bush be essentially typie? you may not know this, but bush won that election -- [laughter] 80 years later, what was essentially a popular vote tied becomes a seven-point blowout, and that shows you how significantly america is changing. itd talks about how hard is for democrats to win it with se
. he brings it up. he did ghetto with hillary clinn the primary and even with john mccain. this election, he cannot run on his record. it was full of claims of imaginary racism, so ultimately the point of the book is, do not fall for it again, america. host: one of the policy that cannot the 1970's is affirmative action. it will be reviewed again by the supreme court in another week and a half. what are your views about the effectiveness, or lack there of of affirmative-action? guest: my law firm brought the case against my alma mater. we won the law school case, we lost the and the grant case. at this point, -- there have been more recent studies about how it is a disaster for black people, but mostly it disaster for america, at this point. by not discriminate on the basis of race. is the way to do it. one of the things that conservatives have generally not like about richard nixon was and he was the first one to impose racial quotas, time lines on the construction industry that was doing business with the government. people of my generation and blogger up in a world with
in 1993. and i worked with john kasic and newt gingrich rich, and it got the job done. we balanced the budget. we were paying off debt. the economy was growing. the unemployment rate was going down and poverty rates were going down. other than that, it didn't work. i didn't like the welfare bill. i voted against it because i didn't believe it provided the kind of child care and work support we needed to provide. we came back in, in 1997, and did it. idon't oppose of people-- don't oppose at all. receiving welfare to have to work. i think it is a good thing to do. i was governor in 1983 when we were in recession. we had no tax increase over that food. -- over that four years. we lowered the tax on ford. -- food. the governors will tell you. spend more money here, spend more money there. and we held the line. in this campaign i have endorsed republican proposals to cut spending. the conservative senator from oklahoma. i am proposing to cut congress today. it simply isn't true to say that i haven't supported spending cuts, because i have done plenty of it in the past. >> thank you. se
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)